Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Overheard

I realized recently that I haven't been talking to the kids about U.S. Presidents like I should be this time of year, so last night over dinner I told them a little about Abraham Lincoln.  I gave them each a penny so they would know what he looked like and told them what I remember about him (far too little).  Then I told them about Melanie's post about the contents of his pockets on the day he died and how the box they were in was opened in the 1970's.

I told them what I remembered of it and then Greg piped in with, "And I heard -- this is really weird, but -- I heard that they also found an ipod in there."  Followed by a  l e n g t h y explanation of how the ipod (nano) was used and what materials it was made of etc.  I rolled my eyes and waited for him to finish.  But then someone else chimed in with, "And there was a cell phone in there!"  "No, it was an mp3 player!"  

I was blocking this all out as I dished out seconds until there was a break and Evie said, "Actually, they found out that it was an mp1 player."   And I burst out laughing.  Because that was funny.  
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The hallway on our main floor is very long and fairly wide (it's very Polish so it's not an open plan and there are doorways off the hall to the playroom, living room, kitchen, bathroom and down stairs.  You can sort of see part of it in one picture on this post) and it's David and Aaron's domain.  They race their cars there, play their wrestling games there and, most recently, play soccer there.  That hallway is always full of loud, usually happy, noises.

Last night before bed David followed me up the stairs saying, "Mom, you wanna know what a cute sport Aaron is?  And what a nice sport?"  (can you tell he doesn't live in a country where he ever really hears the term "good sport" ?)  After I caught my breath again after the darlingness of the question, he told me that they had been playing soccer and every time David had scored a goal Aaron had raised his hands high above him and shouted, "GOOOOOOAL!"  ("DOOOOOOH!") and then clapped and said, "Bravo!"  ("Dah-doh!").  I don't know for sure which I loved more, David's question or Aaron's cheerleading.
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Then, while I was changing his sheets and he was putting on his pajamas, David got all confidential and started telling me lots of interesting stuff, not the least of which was the fact that his teacher had told him that he should have Evie teach him how to read.  

Evie is a very good reader.   Her speed, comprehension and elocution* is really a pleasure to listen to.  In second (or first?) grade her teacher referred us to a something or other where Evie could develop or display or something her talent for reading.  We didn't do anything about it, though, because we're lame (and didn't really know what it was about, as you may have gathered).

I thought that was a pretty good idea for Evie to help him with his reading (she's helped him some in the past).  All last year and all summer long I read with him almost every day for practice, but his progress has been kind of slow.  With Evie, I taught her what sound every letter makes and she pretty much started reading the next day.  

I asked him, "Does your teacher know that I read with you every day?"  And he told me that his teacher just suggested that he read with Ev because she reads "reeeeeeeeeally well" (David's teacher used to be Evie's) and that he shouldn't read with me or dad.  

Of course I was a little curious about that.  "Really!?!  She told you NOT to read with us?"  Finally he sighed and said, "Okay, fine.  You're asking me so I'll tell you the truth.  She said that I shouldn't practice reading with you."  I found this to be very humorous.  

This makes perfect sense, of course.  I mean, she knows that every single time I talk to her I am not confident in my Polish.  It seems obvious that I might not read well in Polish.  But I think I can confidently say that I am not a bad reader in Polish.  It's very easy, actually, because each letter or set of letters only makes one sound.  You just memorize them and you can read.  But his teacher has no way of knowing how I read.  

But of course I had to say, "Tell your teacher that I'm the one who taught Evie to read."  Because I did.  And also because Come On.
*Thanks for the word, Heidi!

21 comments:

Kazzy said...

I am sure you are a very good reader. I am just waiting for you to start a tutorial on your blog teaching us Polish. :) Love your music player. We danced to Milli Vanilli while I got breakfast out!

Kaylynn said...

I love that you are teaching them about Lincoln even when you live on the other side of the world. Good luck on teaching your son to read. Sometimes it just takes longer, and then their progress just completely takes off!

Annette Lyon said...

mp1--smart one, that Evie!

Finnish is the same way--every letter makes one word, so reading it is way easy once you know how to pronounce it. (It's understanding it that's the tricky part!)

When we lived there, my little sister started third grade, and she could read Finnish aloud better than most of her classmates. This drove them crazy, because she had no clue WHAT she was reading.

Barbaloot said...

I'm excited to find out what his teacher says when she learns you taught Evie to read:)

I can read in Spanish with a semi-good accent...but I have no clue what it is that I'm saying:)

Lara said...

Goodness! You're making me feel guilty...I don't ever teach my kids about the Presidents. Perhaps I rely too much on school for that. I guess you don't get to do that.

I love the "cute sport" comment. Absolutely adorable.

Melanie J said...

MP1 player! Hahahaha!

What the Hecklinger?! said...

I definitely agree with David's teacher. You should not be allowed to read with him. I always discourage extra reading time with anyone, because as we all know, it is really a monumental waste of time unless the person is a true orator or linguist.

Erin said...

Awww, Aaron is a very nice sport.

And I'm sure you can teach your kids to read in Polish. Sheesh. Silly teacher.

Sue Q said...

Teachers in Poland LIE to children, remember??!!

Anyway, loved the cheerleading anecdote. I love it when my kids stand up for each other, too!

wendy said...

That is great that you teach your kids "current affairs" and all. It is also heart warming when you see your kids bonding, being pals!! It is an unerasable smile. Are you Polish?? I am just learning about you??

Heather of the EO said...

What a tricky teacher! And what a sweet family you have. I love the GOAL part. Melted my heart!

pam at beyondjustmom said...

Love to hear the kidding in your family! The Ipod/MP3 thing is hilarious. And it's funny how people perceive us differently in different roles. Fabulous comeback for your teacher.

Steph @ Diapers and Divinity said...

I think you should write the teacher a note. In English. With lots of very big words. And explain how you're perfectly capable of teaching your child to read. :)

Erin said...

Nathan kept saying what beautiful Polish Evie had when he watched that video. I had to agree, even if I didn't understand. And she is clever too! What a great joke. I wish my kids were cute sports. We really need work on the sportsmanship among the older siblings especially, so they don't corrupt our cute sport toddler.

Kimberly said...

Evie's comment totally cracked me up!

Heather said...

Those are great! Mp1 player ha ha ha! I love it when kids cheer each other on and when older siblings are proud of what the younger ones can do. So cute!

JustRandi said...

Let's see David's teacher read in English!! Ooooohhh, who's laughing now? Huh?

charrette said...

Evie sounds like my Jeremiah. Totally grown-up sense of humor. Your children and clever and sweet and adorable.

Heidi Ashworth said...

I'm just impressed out of my mind about everything you do to live in a foreign country. I am sure I could never read to my kids in a foreign language. Wow!

Anne said...

I miss you guys! I wish everyone could come to the wedding!!!!

Marivic_Little GrumpyAngel said...

Your kids are all so adorable and precocious. MP1! That's way clever :-) I bet you can speak and read Polish better than the teacher can read and speak English.